Neutering Advice

Ovariohysterectomy in Dogs

(Neuter/Bitch Spay)

General Information

Neutering, or spaying, involves the surgical removal of the ovaries & uterus (ovariohysterectomy), and is commonly performed before the first season. Surgery can be performed from 6-9 months of age, depending on the breed, providing the bitch is not in season (in heat). However if surgery is delayed then the best time to spay is 3 months after a season (or mid-way between seasons).

Benefits

  • Your bitch will no longer come into season – so no mess or inconvenience.

  • She will be unable to become pregnant – so no unwanted litters.

  • The risk of developing a potentially life-threatening uterine infection (pyometra) is removed. This is a not uncommon condition in middle-aged un-spayed bitches.

  • The chances of developing hormone induced mammary (breast) cancer is much decreased.

    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Will spaying change her temperament?           No, a dog’s personality does not fully develop until at least 1 year old. Any changes in personality after spaying at an early age would, most likely, have occurred without spaying.
  • Will it make her fat?            No, the hormonal changes may reduce her metabolic rate slightly, causing a small increase in weight. This is prevented by adjusting food intake & ensuring a good level of exercise is maintained. We advise a weight check 3-4 months after spaying.
  • Shouldn’t my bitch have a season first?           No, there is no medical reason to allow a bitch to have a season before spaying.  She could become pregnant if caught in her first season.
  • Shouldn’t my bitch have a litter first?               No, there is no advantage in breeding a bitch before spaying.  Allowing a bitch to become pregnant can result in the need for a caesarean section or not being able to find suitable homes for the puppies.

The Procedure

  • You will need an appointment 2-4 days prior to surgery for the Veterinary Surgeon to check over your dog to ensure she is fit for surgery.
  • It is important that your dog does not have anything to eat after 8.30pm the night before surgery.
  • After admission she will have a general anaesthetic & surgery is performed through an incision in the abdomen to remove both ovaries & uterus. Three layers of stiches are used to close the incision.
  • Your dog will go home later the same afternoon. Full after care instructions will be given on discharge.
  • A post-op check will need to be booked 2-4 days after surgery & stitches are removed 10-14 days post- surgery.

Ovariohysterectomy in Cats

(Neuter/Spay)

General Information

Neutering, or spaying, involves the surgical removal of the ovaries & uterus (ovariohysterectomy), and is usually performed before the first season. Surgery can be performed from 5-6 months of age. Cats will come into season (in heat or calling) every 3 weeks during the spring & summer. Cats can become pregnant in their first season if not kept indoors or away from un-neutered male cats.

 

Benefits

  • Your cat will no longer come into season.

  • She will be unable to become pregnant – so no unwanted kittens..

  • When in season a female cat will roam in search of a mate & will be more at risk of traffic accidents, neutering reduces this risk.

  • The risk of developing hormone induced mammary (breast) cancer is much decreased.

    Frequently Asked Questions

  • Will spaying change her temperament?           No, a cat’s personality does not fully develop until at least 1 year old. Any changes in personality after spaying at an early age would, most likely, have occurred without spaying.
  • Will it make her fat & lazy?                No, the hormonal changes may reduce her metabolic rate slightly, causing a small increase in weight. This is prevented by adjusting food intake & ensuring that she remains active. We advise a weight check 3-4 months after spaying.
  • Shouldn’t my cat have a litter first?   No, there is no advantage in breeding a cat before spaying.  Allowing a cat to become pregnant can result in the need for a caesarean section or not being able to find suitable homes for the kittens.

The Procedure

  • It is important that your cat does not have anything to eat after 8.30pm the night before surgery.  She should ideally be kept indoors the night before.
  • You will need an early morning appointment on the day of surgery for the Veterinary Surgeon to check over your cat to ensure she is fit for surgery.
  • After admission she will have a general anaesthetic & surgery is performed through an incision in the abdomen to remove both ovaries & uterus. Three layers of stiches are used to close the incision.
  • Your cat will go home later the same afternoon. Full after care instructions will be given on discharge.
  • A post-op check will need to be booked 2-4 days after surgery & stitches are removed 10-14 days post- surgery.

Castration in Dogs

(Neuter)

 

General Information

Castration (neutering) is the surgical removal of the testicles. Surgery can be performed from 6-10 months of age, depending on breed.

Benefits

  • Castration removes a dog’s natural urges to seek a mate, thus reducing the tendency to roam or stray.
  • Neutering may also help with other undesirable, hormone related behaviours.
    • NOTE: Castration alone is NOT a solution for behavioural problems.
  • Certain potentially serious medical conditions are more likely to occur in un-neutered male dogs, such as hernias, prostate problems, testicular tumours; hence castration removes or reduces this risk.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Will castration change his temperament?        No, a dog’s personality does not fully develop until at least 1 year old. Any changes in personality after neutering would, most likely, have occurred without surgery.
  • Will it make him fat?           No, the hormonal changes may reduce his metabolic rate slightly, causing a small increase in weight. This is prevented by adjusting food intake & ensuring a good level of exercise is maintained. We advise a weight check 3-4 months after castration.

 

The Procedure

  • You will need an appointment 2-4 days prior to surgery for the Veterinary Surgeon to check over your dog to ensure he is fit for surgery.
  • It is important that your dog does not have anything to eat after 8.30pm the night before surgery.
  • After admission he will have a general anaesthetic & surgery is performed through an incision just behind the penis; both testicles are removed via one incision. (The scrotum is not removed). Both internal & external stiches are used to close the incision.
  • Your dog will go home later the same afternoon. Full after care instructions will be given on discharge.
  • A post-op check will need to be booked 2-4 days after surgery & stitches are removed 10-14 days post- surgery.

Castration in Cats

(Neuter)

General Information

Castration (neutering) is the surgical removal of the testicles. Surgery can be performed from 5 months of age. There is no evidence that neutering at a young age results in obesity, urinary problems or stunted growth.

 

Benefits

  • Reduction of strong, offensive smelling urine.
  • Less desire to roam or stray, therefore less risk of traffic accidents.
  • Reduction in aggressive behaviour.
  • Less territorial marking – spraying urine.
  • Reduction in fighting over territory, so fewer cat bite wounds or abscesses.
  • Control of cat population; As he will no longer be able to mate, unwanted kittens are reduced.

 

The Procedure

  • It is important that your cat does not have anything to eat after 8.30pm the night before surgery.  He should ideally be kept indoors the night before.
  • You will need an early morning appointment on the day of surgery for the Veterinary Surgeon to check over your cat to ensure he is fit for surgery.
  • After admission he will have a general anaesthetic for the surgery.
  • No external sutures are used.
  • Your cat will go home later the same afternoon. Full after care instructions will be given on discharge.
  • Your cat should be kept indoors, with a litter tray for 24-48 hours after surgery.
  • A post-op check will need to be booked 2-4 days after surgery.

Head Collars Available

A plastic head collar is normally provided with every surgery to help prevent your pet from reaching their stitches, at special request we can supply the Buster Inflate Collar, which is an inflatable ring which goes around your pets neck (this is supplied at an extra charge, please ask for prices) - please ask your vet or nurse when booking your operation for you pets

Recova Shirts are now available for your dogs and cats

 

  • Promotes post-surgical healing, preventing pets from agitating sensitive areas
  • Ideal treatment for skin issues, senior pet ailments and incontinence
  • Helps reduce separation anxiety

 

There is an extra charge for the Recova Shirts, please speak to your vet, vet nurse or receptionist if you would like to have a recova shirt for your pet.

Subject to availibility at your local branch.

 

Our Surgeries

 

 Daleside Veterinary Surgery

309-311 Liverpool Road

Birkdale

Southport

PR8 3DE

Tel: 01704 575606

 

Churchside Veterinary Surgery

5a Preston New Road

Churchtown

Southport

PR9 8PB

Tel: 01704 225105

 

Formby Veterinary Surgery

113 Church Road

Formby

Merseyside

L37 3ND

Tel: 01704 877145

 

Maghull Veterinary Surgery

55 Liverpool Road South

Maghull

Merseyside

L31 7BN

Tel: 0151 531 7719 

Out of Hours Emergency Cover

Barn Lodge Veterinary Hospital

54a Southport Road
Ormskirk
Lancashire
L39 1LX

01695 572 837